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Often important announcements or directions for the Government or community are made during speeches. In this section you will find the complete transcript of some selected speeches for your reading.
 
Valedictory Speech
On 18 May 1974, the electors of Mitchell returned a Liberal for the first time for many years. 34 years later Mr Alan Cadman makes a Valedictory Speech in the House of Representatives
 
GRIEVANCE DEBATE - Housing Affordability
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (4.37 p.m.)—I grieve today about the opportunities denied young people to own their own home in the capitals of Australia.
 
CLASSIFICATION (PUBLICATIONS, FILMS AND COMPUTER GAMES) AMENDMENT (ADVERTISING AND OTHER MATTERS) BILL 2007
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.32 a.m.)—I too want to pay tribute to the member for Makin for her capacity to raise difficult issues in the parliament and to truly represent the people in her electorate.
 
TRADE PRACTICES LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2007
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.43 p.m.)—The Trade Practices Act has been dealt with by this parliament on many occasions and has been examined by committees and specialised groups over a long period of time.
 
AUSTRALIAN CITIZENSHIP AMENDMENT (CITIZENSHIP TESTING) BILL 2007
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.48 p.m.)—From my perspective, the Australian Citizenship Amendment (Citizenship Testing) Bill 2007 has been long awaited.
 
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS (NOTIFICATION AND ASSESSMENT) AMENDMENT (COSMETICS) BILL 2007
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.29 a.m.)—Australian manufacturing industries have for a long time been an interest of mine.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS - Small Business
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.57 p.m.)—Nowhere is small business more important than in regional and rural Australia, where small businesses comprise the majority of businesses.
 
TAX LAWS AMENDMENT (SMALL BUSINESS) BILL 2007
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.51 p.m.)—I would like to deal with the proposed amendment later on in my comments on the Tax Laws Amendment (Small Business) Bill 2007. Firstly I would like to outline to the House and those listening some of the great benefits that small business gives to Australia.
 
TAX LAWS AMENDMENT (SMALL BUSINESS) BILL 2007
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.51 p.m.)—I would like to deal with the proposed amendment later on in my comments on the Tax Laws Amendment (Small Business) Bill 2007.
 
COMMUNICATIONS LEGISLATION AMENDMENT (CONTENT SERVICES) BILL 2007
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (2.06 p.m.)—This matter has been of interest to a number of government members for a substantial time. That interest has been raised by a series of events, particularly in the area of film and literature. As indicated by the member for Grayndler, as the development of new technologies has progressed there has been an increasing concern to examine the impact of internet gaming and other broadcast factors that allow people to participate, sometimes unwillingly, in programs they would not choose to involve themselves in or in which children get caught up in processes which can lead to the satisfaction of paedophiles or to violence.
 
COMMUNICATIONS LEGISLATION AMENDMENT (CONTENT SERVICES) BILL 2007
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (2.06 p.m.)—This matter has been of interest to a number of government members for a substantial time. That interest has been raised by a series of events, particularly in the area of film and literature.
 
APPROPRIATION BILL 2006-2007
APPROPRIATION BILL (NO. 1) 2007-2008 APPROPRIATION BILL (NO. 2) 2007-2008 APPROPRIATION (PARLIAMENTARY DEPARTMENTS) BILL (NO. 1) 2007-2008 APPROPRIATION BILL (NO. 5) 2006-2007 APPROPRIATION BILL (NO. 6) 2006-2007 Second Reading
 
ADJOURNMENT - Mitchell Electorate: Castle Hill
Why is Baulkham Hills Shire Council in such a rush to continue with this eastern ring-road project in circumstances where there has been no pressure from the major developer in the area, QIC, or from the Roads and Traffic Authority?
 
APPROPRIATION BILL (NO. 1) 2007-2008
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (8.50 p.m.)—I will commence my contribution to Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 2007-2008 where the previous speaker, the member for Fraser, left off and deal with Commonwealth-state relations.
 
TAX LAWS AMENDMENT (2007 MEASURES NO. 2) BILL 2007
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.16 a.m.)—The Tax Laws Amendment (2007 Measures No. 2) Bill 2007 contains multiple changes to the tax act. There are seven or eight effective ones. Some are technical, but most of them deal with specific areas that the government has given attention to, either to simplify or to extend current provisions and concessions.
 
AUSTRALIAN CITIZENSHIP BILL 2005 AUSTRALIAN CITIZENSHIP (TRANSITIONALS AND CONSEQUENTIALS) BILL 2005 - Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.32 p.m.)—The Labor Party’s record in citizenship, as in migration, is absolutely appalling.
 
SOCIAL SECURITY AND FAMILY ASSISTANCE LEGISLATION AMENDMENT (MISCELLANEOUS MEASURES) BILL 2006
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.23 a.m.)—The Social Security and Family Assistance Legislation Amendment (Miscellaneous Measures) Bill 2006 contains, as the previous speaker said, a range of measures. On first appearance, it is a composite bill, and we in this place are used to composite bills that cover a whole lot of technical stuff. Sometimes we search through such legislation to find the hidden traps. In this instance, whilst they are not largely significant, the measures that are proposed in this legislation are very significant for a range of people.
 
MIGRATION AMENDMENT (DESIGNATED UNAUTHORISED ARRIVALS) BILL 2006
Second Reading Speech Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (9.58 a.m.)—I completely refute the statement that Australia has played a negative role in the settlement of refugees. Australia leads the world with its settlement and compassionate programs, and the Labor Party are vile and contemptible in trying to paint the picture in any other way.
 
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAWS AMENDMENT BILL 2006
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.20 a.m.)—It is very interesting to hear the Australian Labor Party wax lyrical about innovation and patents and trademarks et cetera. The closest I can remember them ever getting to anything in this area was producing a spaghetti-like photograph that said: ‘That is where our future is going’. As for dealing with patents or trademarks, I cannot remember one initiative, one piece of legislation—anything—that the Australian Labor Party produced during their term in office to deal with innovation and these issues.
 
BROADCASTING SERVICES AMENDMENT (SUBSCRIPTION TELEVISION DRAMA AND COMMUNITY BROADCASTING LICENCES) BILL 2006
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (6.36 p.m.)—The Broadcasting Services Amendment (Subscription Television Drama and Community Broadcasting Licences) Bill 2006 deals with subscription television and it follows a review that was done some time ago. The current provisions allow for a 10 per cent expenditure by subscription broadcasters on Australian drama. However, following the review, there have been proposals for change.
 
DO NOT CALL REGISTER BILL 2006
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.24 a.m.)—A Do Not Call Register is really a database with a list of names and numbers of people who do not want to have unsolicited calls. I think the Do Not Call Register Bill 2006 and the Do Not Call Register (Consequential Amendments) Bill 2006 are going to be welcomed by many Australians.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS - Religious Minorities - Speech
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.57 p.m.)—I ask leave of the House to amend notice No. 2, private members’ business, in the terms circulated to honourable members. Leave granted.
 
CHILD SUPPORT LEGISLATION AMENDMENT (REFORM OF THE CHILD SUPPORT SCHEME—INITIAL MEASURES) BILL 2006
Second Reading Speech Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.29 a.m.)—This is a long process that is coming to fruition. The original proposals were made, I suspect, by the parliamentary inquiry into child custody arrangements in the event of family separation, which was undertaken in 2003 by the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Family and Community Affairs.
 
DELEGATION REPORTS
Parliamentary Delegation to the Asia Pacific Parliamentary Forum, Jakarta, and to Papua New Guinea Speech
 
CANCER AUSTRALIA BILL 2006: Second Reading Speech
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.23 p.m.)—The Cancer Australia Bill 2006 is a terrific initiative for cancer sufferers. It brings for the first time into the government ambit a strong commitment in a way that all Australians would endorse. The carping negativity of the opposition is resented and rejected by the government. This innovation is a great improvement on the way in which this nation considers cancer.
 
ADJOURNMENT Hillsong Emerge Speech
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (7.44 p.m.)—Some time ago, an excellent proposal was put to the federal government by Hillsong Emerge. Hillsong Emerge is an organisation similar to Anglicare or Centrecare and is an outreach program of the Hillsong Church. The Hillsong Church is a large church in my electorate with a large attendance, including many young people.
 
ADJOURNMENT - Iraq Speech
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (4.42 p.m.)—I was encouraged by some of the remarks of Tony Blair, the British Prime Minister, about Australia’s role in the Middle East and particularly the war in Iraq. As part of the grievance debate, I am obliged to grieve for some of the misinformation in and lack of direction shown by some sections of the media and the Australian community. While I understand the differences of opinion, we have had three leaders make statements over the last few days on this war and the circumstances in which Australia finds itself in the Middle East. Those leaders have been democratically elected by great nations.
 
FAMILY LAW AMENDMENT (SHARED PARENTAL RESPONSIBILITY) BILL 2005
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.24 a.m.)—The work done in the Family Law Amendment (Shared Parental Responsibility) Bill 2005, which we are considering today, had its genesis in 2003.
 
ADJOURNMENT - Hillsong Emerge Ltd
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (4.54 p.m.)—My attention has been drawn to press reports of Senate estimates committees and the Australian Labor Party’s effort to discredit Hillsong Emerge. Hillsong is a large church within my electorate and has an outreach and welfare arm called Hillsong Emerge.
 
THERAPEUTIC GOODS AMENDMENT (REPEAL OF MINISTERIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR APPROVAL OF RU486) BILL 2005
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.06 a.m.)—In looking at this issue—and I have studied it for some time—I first of all looked at why the Minister for Health and Ageing made the decision he made. It seemed to have provoked a reaction amongst the women in the Senate.
 
Family and Human Services Committee Report
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.14 a.m.)—The report of the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Family and Human Services entitled Overseas adoption in Australia: report on the inquiry into adoption of children from overseas is one of the most pleasing reports I have been involved with.
 
HIGHER EDUCATION LEGISLATION AMENDMENT (WORKPLACE RELATIONS REQUIREMENTS) BILL 2005 - Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.47 p.m.)—Australian universities are attracting overseas students because of the quality of the education they provide.
 
HEALTH INSURANCE AMENDMENT (MEDICARE SAFETY-NETS) BILL 2005 - Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (6.48 p.m.)—I want to briefly reiterate the significance of the Health Insurance Amendment (Medicare Safety-nets) Bill 2005, which confirms the place in society of the Medicare safety net—a process which allows people to move with confidence into medical care and support. It was a commitment made during the last election campaign; it is in place.
 
PERSONAL EXPLANATIONS
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (5.17 p.m.) —Mr Deputy Speaker, I wish to make a personal explanation
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS: Human Rights: Burma
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (3.34 p.m.) —I find a great deal to agree with in the honourable member's motion. There is no doubt in my view and the view of the government that the Burmese regime is a barbaric, isolationist and parasitic one.
 
TAX LAWS AMENDMENT (2004 MEASURES NO. 7) BILL 2004: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.28 p.m.) —The Tax Laws Amendment (2004 Measures No. 7) Bill 2004 before the House today includes a number of measures.
 
SUPERANNUATION SUPERVISORY LEVY IMPOSITION AMENDMENT BILL 2004Cognate bills:
AUTHORISED DEPOSIT-TAKING INSTITUTIONS SUPERVISORY LEVY IMPOSITION AMENDMENT BILL 2004LIFE INSURANCE SUPERVISORY LEVY IMPOSITION AMENDMENT BILL 2004GENERAL INSURANCE SUPERVISORY LEVY IMPOSITION AMENDMENT BILL 2004RETIREMENT SAVINGS ACCOUNT PROVIDERS SUPERVISORY LEVY IMPOSITION AMENDMENT BILL 2004FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS SUPERVISORY LEVIES COLLECTION AMENDMENT BILL 2004AUTHORISED NON-OPERATING HOLDING COMPANIES SUPERVISORY LEVY IMPOSITION AMENDMENT BILL 2004: Second Reading
 
MATTERS OF PUBLIC IMPORTANCE: Howard Government: Performance
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (4.10 p.m.) —Someone making claims of integrity and honesty and accusing others of lacking those attributes should first of all be examined to see whether or not those claims can be justified in relation to their own conduct.
 
GOVERNOR-GENERAL'S SPEECH: Address-in-Reply
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (3.31 p.m.) —Few people in Australia would not acknowledge that the basis of the confidence that this country has experienced has been laid down by the government's building on the economic base that inspires confidence and commitment to growth and future investment in Australia.
 
GOVERNOR-GENERAL'S SPEECH: Address-in-Reply
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.41 p.m.) —Mr Speaker, I congratulate you on your appointment as Speaker and your exhibition of generosity in the last few minutes.
 
ANTI-TERRORISM BILL (NO. 3) 2004: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.43 p.m.) —The Anti-terrorism Bill (No. 3) 2004 has three main objectives. They are quite simple, and they add to a whole raft of initiatives taken by this government to amend our security laws and to make a legal framework which is adequate for Australia's needs in this day and age.
 
MARRIAGE LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL 2004: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (6.20 p.m.) —I rise to support the Marriage Legislation Amendment Bill 2004. I think it is sensible and timely.
 
TAX LAWS AMENDMENT (2004 MEASURES NO. 2) BILL 2004Cognate bill:TAX LAWS AMENDMENT (2004 MEASURES NO. 3) BILL 2004: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.47 p.m.) —The Tax Laws Amendment (2004 Measures No. 2) Bill 2004 and the Tax Laws Amendment (2004 Measures No. 3) Bill 2004 contain a series of amendments to the tax act.
 
SUPERANNUATION LAWS AMENDMENT (2004 MEASURES NO. 1) BILL 2004Cognate bill:SUPERANNUATION LAWS AMENDMENT (2004 MEASURES NO. 2) BILL 2004 : Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.09 p.m.) —There are two superannuation bills before the House today, the Superannuation Laws Amendment (2004 Measures No. 1) Bill 2004 and the cognate bill, the Superannuation Laws Amendment (2004 Measures No. 2) Bill 2004.
 
APPROPRIATION BILL (NO. 1) 2004-2005Cognate bills:APPROPRIATION BILL (NO. 2) 2004-2005APPROPRIATION (PARLIAMENTARY DEPARTMENTS) BILL (NO. 1) 2004-2005APPROPRIATION BILL (NO. 5) 2003-2004APPROPRIATION BILL (NO. 6) 2003-2004: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (4.10 p.m.) —It is a delight to be able to speak on the Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 2004-2005 in this cognate debate on this year's budget. I want to focus my remarks on Australian families.
 
ELECTORAL AND REFERENDUM AMENDMENT (ACCESS TO ELECTORAL ROLL AND OTHER MEASURES) BILL 2004Cognate bill:ELECTORAL AND REFERENDUM AMENDMENT (ENROLMENT INTEGRITY AND OTHER MEASURES) BILL 2004: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.31 p.m.) —For a member of the Australian parliament to come in here and say that nobody should think about registering to vote until an election is called is irresponsible.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS: Crimes Against Humanity
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.11 p.m.) —The government shares the concern of the member for Sydney that Australia should not harbour serious international criminals.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS: World Health Assembly: Taiwan
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (4.34 p.m.) —I am delighted that we are debating this motion, and I want to thank the member for Dunkley for deciding to confront this issue.
 
OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (COMMONWEALTH EMPLOYMENT) AMENDMENT (EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT AND COMPLIANCE) BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (6.24 p.m.) —The Occupational Health and Safety (Commonwealth Employment) Amendment (Employee Involvement and Compliance) Bill 2002 is a real change to the ethos of occupational health and safety and follows further efforts by this government to bring to the workplace environment genuine consultation between employers and employees.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS: Pneumococcal Vaccine
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (5.11 p.m.) —The expert committee, the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation—ATAGI—has made a number of recommendations over the last 12 months.
 
ADJOURNMENT: Small Business: Opposition Policy
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (4.59 p.m.) —I want to say a few things about the opposition's policy for small business.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS: Battle of Vinegar Hill: 200th Anniversary
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (4.16 p.m.) —The Hills district is known for its battles. I have recently just come through one—it was nothing like the Battle of Vinegar Hill, though.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS: Employee Share Ownership
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.27 p.m.) —I would love the member for Rankin to go down to Wollongong and talk to the 11,000 employees of BHP who received $1,000 each, tax-free, as part of an employee share scheme.
 
A NEW TAX SYSTEM (COMMONWEALTH-STATE FINANCIAL ARRANGEMENTS) AMENDMENT BILL 2003: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.08 a.m.) —The only problems that have been created with the collection and distribution of taxation have been created by the Australian Labor Party working in cooperation with the Independents and the Democrats in the Senate.
 
CORPORATE LAW ECONOMIC REFORM PROGRAM (AUDIT REFORM AND CORPORATE DISCLOSURE) BILL 2003Cognate bill:CORPORATIONS (FEES) AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 2) 2003: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (6.41 p.m.) —I rise to speak on the Corporate Law Economic Reform Program (Audit Reform and Corporate Disclosure) Bill 2003 and the cognate bill, the Corporations (Fees) Amendment Bill (No. 2) 2003.
 
WORKPLACE RELATIONS AMENDMENT (SIMPLIFYING AGREEMENT-MAKING) BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (9.06 a.m.) —In the years 1997, 1998, 1999 and 2000, the number of working days lost per 1,000 employees was 75, 72, 87 and 60 days respectively—an average of 73.5 days per 1,000 employees. In each of the 10 years prior to the commencement of the Workplace Relations Act, the average number of working days lost per 1,000 employees was 174 days.
 
HEALTH LEGISLATION AMENDMENT (PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE REFORM) BILL 2003: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.48 p.m.) —Thank you, Mr Deputy Speaker. I will follow your injunction with care. I was listening for some time, from my room, to the previous member and was aware of her transgressing the standing order that I know you are going to enforce. [start page 24288]
 
COMMITTEES: Standing Committee on Family and Community Affairs: Report
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.24 a.m.) —In Australia the number of marriages taking place per year has for the last 10 years been 110,000 to 115,000. The number of divorces which have also taken place over that 10-year period has gradually increased from about 42,000 to 49,000 in 2000. The number of divorces involving children is almost the total number: they nearly all involve children to some extent.
 
SUPERANNUATION LEGISLATION AMENDMENT (CHOICE OF SUPERANNUATION FUNDS) BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.01 a.m.) —I rise to speak on the Superannuation Legislation Amendment (Choice of Superannuation Funds) Bill 2002. I have in my hands a report by the Australian Senate Select Committee on Superannuation dated November 2002. It has taken one year for the Labor Party to think about it.
 
DEFENCE LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL 2003: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.56 a.m.) —It is a pleasure to rise to make my contribution on the Defence Legislation Amendment Bill 2003. This bill has three basic parts.
 
TRADE PRACTICES LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL 2003: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.47 a.m.) —I rise to speak on the Trade Practices Legislation Amendment Bill 2003. This is an interesting change to the trade practices legislation which has been proposed by the government.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS: Hepatitis C
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.33 p.m.) —Nobody would deny that hepatitis C is a serious disease and one that causes great distress to sufferers. There are a large number of people suffering from hepatitis C in Australia.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS: Hepatitis C
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.43 p.m.) —by leave—I only have a couple of minutes, but I need to point out to the House that 31 million needles were distributed last year at a cost of $22 million to the Australian public.
 
STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS: Higher Education: Funding
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.48 p.m.) —I want to commend the Commonwealth Minister for Education, Science and Training, Dr Brendan Nelson, for the way in which he is helping to solve some of the problems of tertiary education—higher education—in Western Sydney.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS: Transport and Urban Development
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (4.05 p.m.) —After first being promoted by the member for Chifley, Badgerys Creek is now off the agenda. Everything else is on the agenda, subject to an environmental impact statement, including the air base at Richmond.
 
INDONESIA: TERRORIST ATTACKS
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.18 p.m.) —On 9 October this year the Prime Minister of Australia moved a motion expressing concern, regrets and sympathy for, firstly, the victims who lost their lives in the horrific terrorist attack on 12 October 2002.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS: North Korea
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.25 p.m.) —I move That this House:
 
FAMILY ASSISTANCE LEGISLATION AMENDMENT (EXTENSION OF TIME LIMITS) BILL 2003: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (6.51 p.m.) —The measures we are debating tonight with the Family Assistance Legislation Amendment (Extension of Time Limits) Bill 2003 are far-sighted.
 
COMMITTEES: Family and Community Affairs Committee: Report
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.23 a.m.) —This is a very comprehensive report.
 
TAXATION LAWS AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 8) 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (9.21 a.m.) —The Taxation Laws Amendment Bill (No. 8) 2003 is a composite bill. It makes income tax deductions available for gifts to a range of organisations. Some of the organisations are new, some have had their names changed and some have extensions to existing deductibility.
 
TAXATION LAWS AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 7) 2003: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (6.33 p.m.) —Mr Deputy Speaker Barresi, it will not surprise you one little bit to find out that I absolutely oppose and condemn the amendment.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS: Middle East Road Map to Peace
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.19 p.m.) —I move: That this House:
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS BUSINESS: Sydney's Second Airport
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (4.38 p.m.) —This is an unexpected occurrence: to see the dissidents of the Australian Labor Party—those opposed to the announced policy that there would be no Badgerys Creek—given a run in the parliament to present their case pro Badgerys Creek.
 
MIGRATION LEGISLATION AMENDMENT (SPONSORSHIP MEASURES) BILL 2003: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (6.49 p.m.) —The Migration Legislation Amendment (Sponsorship Measures) Bill 2003 is about sponsorship and a change in the way in which sponsorship of migrants is carried out in Australia. It is a very sensible approach, because sponsorship seeks to spread the responsibility for the integrity and truth behind an application for entry into Australia.
 
SUPERANNUATION (GOVERNMENT CO-CONTRIBUTION FOR LOW INCOME EARNERS) BILL 2003Cognate bill:SUPERANNUATION (GOVERNMENT CO-CONTRIBUTION FOR LOW INCOME EARNERS) (CONSEQUENTIAL AMENDMENTS) BILL 2003: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.04 a.m.) —I rise to speak on the cognate debate on the Superannuation (Government Co-contribution for Low Income Earners) Bill 2003.
 
AUSTRALIAN PRUDENTIAL REGULATION AUTHORITY AMENDMENT BILL 2003: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.57 a.m.) —I rise to speak on the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority Amendment Bill 2003. I listened to the previous member's contribution with a great deal of interest and found in what he said much with which I agree.
 
SUPERANNUATION (SURCHARGE RATE REDUCTION) AMENDMENT BILL 2003: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (6.11 p.m.) —That is a strange amendment to the second reading motion for the Superannuation (Surcharge Rate Reduction) Amendment Bill 2003, I have to say.
 
EXPORT MARKET DEVELOPMENT GRANTS AMENDMENT BILL 2003: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (7.12 p.m.) —The bill that the House is debating tonight is the Export Market Development Grants Amendment Bill 2003.
 
MATTERS OF PUBLIC IMPORTANCE: Howard Government: Workplace Relations
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (5.23 p.m.) —I do not think anybody in this House really endorses golden handshakes for poor performances. I do not think anybody wants to think that company executives should be rewarded for failure, disappointment and loss of investment.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS BUSINESS: Australians in Guantanamo Bay
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.31 p.m.) —This is a difficult case, I acknowledge that. But we are dealing here with something that is a little unusual for Australia, and that is the prospect of one of our citizens being involved in a terrorist organisation or, as is alleged, having links with Al-Qaeda.
 
TAXATION LAWS AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 7) 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.36 a.m.) —It is an honour to be starting this debate somewhat earlier than I expected, and I appreciate the opportunity.
 
CORPORATIONS LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL 2002Cognate bills:CORPORATIONS (FEES) AMENDMENT BILL 2002CORPORATIONS (REVIEW FEES) BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.33 a.m.) —By its title—Corporations Legislation Amendment Bill 2002—this bill is one that you would think that only accountants and corporate lawyers would be interested in.
 
NATIONAL BLOOD AUTHORITY BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.59 a.m.) —In addressing the National Blood Authority Bill 2002, I want to endorse the words brilliantly expressed by the previous speaker, the member for Boothby, who is medically qualified.
 
Iraq
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (6.23 p.m.) —The main complaint here in the chamber seems to be that we should not be going into conflict now but should be waiting for yet another resolution of the United Nations.
 
MEDICAL INDEMNITY (PRUDENTIAL SUPERVISION AND PRODUCT STANDARDS) BILL 2002Cognate bill:MEDICAL INDEMNITY (PRUDENTIAL SUPERVISION AND PRODUCT STANDARDS) (CONSEQUENTIAL AMENDMENTS) BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (6.26 p.m.) —I listened with interest to the previous speaker, the member for Chisholm, and I welcome her thoughtful contribution. This area of medical insurance and indemnity confronting doctors and specialists is something that is of concern to everybody.
 
APPROPRIATION BILL (NO. 3) 2002-03Cognate bill:APPROPRIATION BILL (NO. 4) 2002-03: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (8.30 p.m.) —In rising tonight to speak on the Appropriation Bill (No. 3) 2002-2003, I want to look for a few minutes at the economic prospects of Australia, at the forthcoming budget and at what the future may hold.
 
ADJOURNMENT: Mitchell Electorate: Education
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (9.24 p.m.) —I have some really terrific news for the parliament: I am going to tell the House tonight what this government is doing for education in my electorate. It is just tremendous. It is about time the Premier of New South Wales, Bob Carr, got his act together, put his action where his mouth is and increased funding to education in New South Wales at the same rate as the Commonwealth is increasing funding to both government and non-government schools.
 
FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SERVICES LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.38 a.m.) —I want to deal with the broader issue of families, which is part of the Family and Community Services Legislation Amendment Bill 2002 before the House today.
 
BUSHFIRES
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.06 a.m.) —I think Mr Kelvin Thomson's speech is another example of the urban community giving advice to the bush, to people who have lived there for hundreds of years.
 
ADJOURNMENT: Mitchell Electorate: Bushfires
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.15 p.m.) — I want to talk about the bushfires in our area. They have been really serious. I want to describe to the House the commitment of firefighters, the dedication of volunteers, some of the tragedies that have occurred and some of the follow-on that will occur after the fires.
 
COMMONWEALTH VOLUNTEERS PROTECTION BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.42 a.m.) —The speech we have just heard from the member for Oxley has given me a great idea, Mr Deputy Speaker: to read a list of the organisations in my electorate if I have not got a speech to make. I rise to speak on the Commonwealth Volunteers Protection Bill 2002.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS BUSINESS: Credit Unions
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.56 p.m.) —I wish to express my appreciation to the member for Hinkler and endorse the motion he has moved and the comments he has made in the House today.
 
FINANCIAL SECTOR LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 2) 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.55 a.m.) —There is no doubt that this House will have a very extensive debate when the royal commission makes its findings, and I do not think anybody would seek to prevent that from occurring.
 
WORKPLACE RELATIONS LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.20 a.m.) —The objective of the Workplace Relations Legislation Amendment Bill 2002 is to transfer the responsibility of compensation and occupational health and safety from a seafarers specific organisation to Comcare.
 
COMMITTEES: Education and Training Committee: Report
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.51 a.m.) —It was a pleasure to be involved in the report of the inquiry of the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Education and Training into the education of boys, Boys: getting it right.
 
ENVIRONMENT AND HERITAGE LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2002Cognate bills:AUSTRALIAN HERITAGE COUNCIL BILL 2002AUSTRALIAN HERITAGE COUNCIL (CONSEQUENTIAL AND TRANSITIONAL PROVISIONS) BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (8.12 p.m.) —Thank you, Mr Deputy Speaker Price. I know that you of all the occupiers of the chair will appreciate more than most the significance of our heritage.
 
TAXATION LAWS AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 5) 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (4.50 p.m.) —I want to thank the previous speaker for a delightfully entertaining segment in his speech. It illustrated part of this legislation—that is, stock valuation—very effectively by examining the way in which that was done in the wine industry.
 
HEALTH INSURANCE AMENDMENT (PROFESSIONAL SERVICES REVIEW AND OTHER MATTERS) BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (5.36 p.m.) —I thank the previous speaker for the manner in which he has moved his amendment. I know that the government will consider such a sensible proposal. I am not in a position to know whether or not it can be implemented, but I guess he will find that out at a later point.
 
SUPERANNUATION (GOVERNMENT CO-CONTRIBUTION FOR LOW INCOME EARNERS) BILL 2002Cognate bill:SUPERANNUATION LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (5.53 p.m.) —I rise to speak on the Superannuation (Government Co-contribution for Low Income Earners) Bill 2002 and the Superannuation Legislation Amendment Bill 2002. Mr Deputy Speaker Wilkie, I know you cannot comment on the remarks made previously by one of our colleagues, but I am sure that there would be no way a person of your status and standing could possibly agree with those remarks.
 
INDONESIA: TERRORIST ATTACKS
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (8.22 p.m.) —This has been a sad process for the parliament as we have examined the affairs in Bali. The concept of terrorism is to disrupt, to overshadow, to subjugate, to make uncertain, to have people lose confidence and to make them unsure of their day-to-day living. The purpose of terrorism is to strike in an indiscriminate manner so that people do not know, cannot suspect and cannot plan their lives. [start page 8098]
 
MEDICAL INDEMNITY AGREEMENT (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE--BINDING COMMONWEALTH OBLIGATIONS) BILL 2002
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (7.11 p.m.) —I am delighted to see that there is some doubt in the Australian Labor Party about whether its own amendments are worth backing, and I would have to say that I share those views. The whole problem that has been created with medical insurance really started with the problems identified in HIH.
 
ADJOURNMENT: Mitchell Electorate: Alcohol and Drug Use
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (7.53 p.m.) —I wish to make some comments about remarks made by Senator George Campbell in the Senate today. Senator George Campbell made some critical remarks about protest meetings endeavouring to stop the establishment of a hotel in the main street of Castle Hill, which is in the centre of my electorate.
 
TAXATION LAWS AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 3) 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.40 a.m.) —The Taxation Laws Amendment Bill (No. 3) 2002 imposes a number of changes on tax laws. They appear to be straightforward until one looks at some of the changes that are being made to the application of the GST with respect to land development.
 
GRIEVANCE DEBATE: New South Wales: Planning Processes
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (5.21 p.m.) —I wish to complain about the planning processes used by the government of New South Wales in newly developing areas in the north-west of Sydney.
 
RESEARCH INVOLVING EMBRYOS BILL 2002: Consideration in Detail
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (9.21 p.m.) —I refer to clause 25(2)(d)(ii) in the section of the bill dealing with exempt uses:
 
RESEARCH INVOLVING EMBRYOS BILL 2002: Consideration in Detail
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (8.11 p.m.) —We are past the point in this legislation where the moral argument counts. We had that vote. This is about the science of the issue.
 
RESEARCH INVOLVING EMBRYOS BILL 2002: Consideration in Detail
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (6.08 p.m.) —We are continuing the debate in the consideration in detail stage on the Research Involving Embryos Bill 2002. When the House last dealt with this issue, I had moved amendments to clause 25, page 9.
 
RESEARCH INVOLVING EMBRYOS BILL 2002: Consideration in Detail
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.35 p.m.) —I want to briefly refer to the remarks made by the previous speaker, the member for Bonython, and indicate that I do not accept the argument of the peer review process being the only criteria as compared with a sunset clause. I believe that we as parliamentarians need to see the involvement of the parliament in this process; hence the amendments.
 
RESEARCH INVOLVING EMBRYOS BILL 2002: Consideration in Detail
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.54 p.m.) —I move:
 
RESEARCH INVOLVING EMBRYOS BILL 2002: Consideration in Detail
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.33 a.m.) —I could not believe my ears and I am sorry that I could not contain myself, but the speaker was speaking for the opposition. He was not speaking on his own conscience.
 
RESEARCH INVOLVING EMBRYOS BILL 2002: Consideration in Detail
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.51 a.m.) —This clause is the one that deals with the way the review of these decisions in the legislation takes place.
 
RESEARCH INVOLVING EMBRYOS BILL 2002: Consideration in Detail
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (9.45 p.m.) —I rise to contest some of the views that have been put about the purpose of these amendments. Point No. 1, this is a bill to deal with embryonic stem cell research, and that is clearly stated in the first amendment: that embryos used under this legislation should be used by a licensed person and they should be used for the purposes of stem cell research. No. 2, embryos should not be damaged or destroyed in this process.
 
RESEARCH INVOLVING EMBRYOS BILL 2002: Consideration in Detail
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (9.20 p.m.) —by leave—I move the amendments to clause 25 of the Research Involving Embryos Bill 2002 which have been circulated in my name:
 
RESEARCH INVOLVING EMBRYOS AND PROHIBITION OF HUMAN CLONING LEGISLATION: Suspension of Standing Orders
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (9.51 a.m.) —I want to indicate my appreciation to the Leader of the House and to the Leader of Opposition Business for the sensible way in which this is being approached.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS BUSINESS: Research Involving Embryos and Prohibition of Human Cloning Legislation
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (10.14 a.m.) —I appeal to my colleagues to allow the splitting of the Research Involving Embryos and Prohibition of Human Cloning Bill 2002, if it is within their conscience to do so. I understand what the member for Perth has said about the position of the Australian Labor Party and I can understand the reasons behind that.
 
NEW BUSINESS TAX SYSTEM (CONSOLIDATION, VALUE SHIFTING, DEMERGERS AND OTHER MEASURES) BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (6.42 p.m.) —I too support this legislation, the New Business Tax System (Consolidation, Value Shifting, Demergers and Other Measures) Bill 2002. It is complex and it is large.
 
TRADE PRACTICES AMENDMENT (LIABILITY FOR RECREATIONAL SERVICES) BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (9.14 p.m.) —The Trade Practices Amendment (Liability for Recreational Services) Bill 2002 is important legislation which deals with some of the risk factors that have been experienced by community and sporting bodies following problems in the insurance industry which have been brought about for a whole range of reasons.
 
RESEARCH INVOLVING EMBRYOS AND PROHIBITION OF HUMAN CLONING BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.49 a.m.) —I believe that the people of Australia want us to be careful in the decision we are making about the use of embryos for research.
 
HIGHER EDUCATION FUNDING AMENDMENT BILL 2002Cognate bill:HIGHER EDUCATION LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 2) 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (2.25 a.m.) —I want to go a bit beyond the scope of the Higher Education Funding Amendment Bill 2002 but stay within the tertiary education area, particularly in regard to the arrangements for agricultural education not only across Australia but also in New South Wales.
 
HIGHER EDUCATION FUNDING AMENDMENT BILL 2002Cognate bill:HIGHER EDUCATION LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 2) 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (2.42 a.m.) —I know that the House has been absolutely riveted by what I have had to say. I must confess at this point that it is not completely my own work. I have to confess that I was able to gather a team of very well informed people together to look at agricultural education in New South Wales, and it included people like the—(Quorum formed) I was just about to recount the processes that I used to investigate agricultural education at a tertiary level in New South Wales.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS: Cochlear Implants
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (3.41 p.m.) —I am pleased that the member for Griffith has raised this issue, because it does need the attention of the House. He has raised a concern that has been expressed by people in the community who are worried about the prospect of upgrades to cochlear implants.
 
MIGRATION LEGISLATION AMENDMENT (FURTHER BORDER PROTECTION MEASURES) BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.11 a.m.) —I am absolutely opposed to the amendments and propositions put by the Labor Party. It is no wonder that they are in a state of shock reading the headlines in the Australian today saying that they are going nowhere, have no ideas and do not have the capacity to formulate policies that are cohesive and coherent in order to deal with difficult problems like border protection.
 
FINANCIAL SECTOR LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.30 p.m.) —The Financial Sector Legislation Amendment Bill (No. 1) 2002 before the House today comprises a whole range of minor amendments to a range of legislation, including the Financial Institutions Supervisory Levies Collection Act, the Financial Sector (Transfers of Business) Act, the General Insurance Reform Act, the Insurance Acquisitions and Takeovers Act, the Life Insurance Act, the Reserve Bank Act, the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act and the Superannuation Supervisory Levy Imposition Act.
 
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS: Western Sydney
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (4.25 p.m.) —I am delighted to participate in this debate and I want to thank the member for Greenway for bringing it on. Federal members in Western Sydney have an important leadership role in regard to our youth, and we ought to be taking up the challenge of encouraging federal, state and local authorities to pay attention to the needs of our youth.
 
TAXATION LAWS AMENDMENT (SUPERANNUATION) BILL (NO. 2) 2002Cognate bill:SUPERANNUATION GUARANTEE CHARGE AMENDMENT BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.57 p.m.) —I rise to speak on the Taxation Laws Amendment (Superannuation) Bill (No. 2) 2002. I am amazed at what the Australian Labor Party is doing to this budget.
 
NEW BUSINESS TAX SYSTEM (CONSOLIDATION) BILL (NO. 1) 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (5.05 p.m.) —Deputy Speaker Wilkie, I am delighted to see you in the chair. I will wind up my remarks on the New Business Tax System (Consolidation) Bill (No. 1) 2002, which is a complex piece of legislation the result of which I think will be beneficial.
 
NEW BUSINESS TAX SYSTEM (CONSOLIDATION) BILL (NO. 1) 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.45 p.m.) —I reject any comments that have been made about this government not being a reformist government. Today we are entering into the first part of a two-stage process to reform the taxation of business.
 
APPROPRIATION BILL (NO. 1) 2002-2003: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (1.25 p.m.) —I cannot believe that a spokesman for education is so poor on numeracy. I would have thought that one of the prerequisites for the Leader of the Opposition in choosing someone to advance education policy is that they can do their sums.
 
FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SERVICES LEGISLATION AMENDMENT (DISABILITY REFORM) BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (11.07 a.m.) —I begin my remarks on Family and Community Services Legislation Amendment (Disability Reform) Bill 2002 by saying that I am amazed that the previous speaker, the member for Canberra, has not taken the time or the effort when she says she is so concerned about people with disabilities to look at the total package of the provision of personal care and assistance and the extra funding that is offered in this package for disabled people.
 
TAXATION LAWS AMENDMENT (SUPERANNUATION) BILL (NO. 2) 2002Cognate bill:SUPERANNUATION GUARANTEE CHARGE AMENDMENT BILL 2002
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.57 p.m.) —I rise to speak on the Taxation Laws Amendment (Superannuation) Bill (No. 2) 2002. I am amazed at what the Australian Labor Party is doing to this budget.
 
APPROPRIATION BILL (NO. 3) 2001-2002 Cognate bills: APPROPRIATION BILL (NO. 4) 2001-2002 APPROPRIATION (PARLIAMENTARY DEPARTMENTS) BILL (NO. 2) 2001-2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (4.29 p.m.) - With respect to the Appropriation Bill (No. 3) 2001-2002, the Appropriation Bill (No. 4) 2001-2002 and the Appropriation (Parliamentary Departments) Bill (No. 2) 2001-2002, I want to look at what is happening to employment and employment services around Australia.
 
SECURITY LEGISLATION AMENDMENT (TERRORISM) BILL 2002 [NO. 2]Cognate bills:SUPPRESSION OF THE FINANCING OF TERRORISM BILL 2002 CRIMINAL CODE AMENDMENT (SUPPRESSION OF TERRORIST BOMBINGS) BILL 2002 BORDER SECURITY LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL 2002 TELECO
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (12.47 p.m.) -One must wonder where the Australian Labor Party really is going in its so-called stand against terrorism. You are prepared to throw the whole responsibility of the House of Representatives over to the Senate, let them go away in a committee and spend days and days in committee and then move amendments ad nauseam in the Senate. There is no commitment in that.
 
TRANSPORT AND REGIONAL SERVICES LEGISLATION AMENDMENT (APPLICATION OF CRIMINAL CODE) BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (5.06 p.m.) - What a fascinating speech by the member for Batman. It seems to me that Labor Party ministers will go out there and write the air navigation rules, and every time something goes wrong the minister will go and make the corrections himself. We are going to have a very proactive minister who will investigate everything and decide everything. The decisions will have to go through caucus, of course, but it is only the safety and lives of people.
 
AUSTRALIAN CITIZENSHIP LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL 2002: Second Reading
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (5.58 p.m.) - Mr Deputy Speaker Barresi, I am delighted to see you are in the chair because I know you have a long and well-established interest in these matters. The amendments the House is considering today to the Australian Citizenship Legislation Amendment Bill 2002 relate to the citizenship act. This legislation looks at the common bond that Australians share.
 
GRIEVANCE DEBATE: Family Law Act
Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (4.15 p.m.) - I want to grieve today about some aspects of the Family Law Act. I have come across a particularly distressing case and whilst I know that a particular problem can often create bad law if one moves to resolve it I do believe that this case epitomises a problem of the Family Law Act and by way of amendment a better result can be achieved.
 
 




Education Update
Rural Fire Service
 
Mental Health Targets
 
 
Valedictory Speech
GRIEVANCE DEBATE - Housing Affordability
TRADE PRACTICES LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2007
CLASSIFICATION (PUBLICATIONS, FILMS AND COMPUTER GAMES) AMENDMENT (ADVERTISING AND OTHER MATTERS) BILL 2007
AUSTRALIAN CITIZENSHIP AMENDMENT (CITIZENSHIP TESTING) BILL 2007
 
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