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HIGHER EDUCATION FUNDING AMENDMENT BILL 2002Cognate bill:HIGHER EDUCATION LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 2) 2002: Second Reading

Mr CADMAN (Mitchell) (2.42 a.m.) —I know that the House has been absolutely riveted by what I have had to say. I must confess at this point that it is not completely my own work. I have to confess that I was able to gather a team of very well informed people together to look at agricultural education in New South Wales, and it included people like the—(Quorum formed) I was just about to recount the processes that I used to investigate agricultural education at a tertiary level in New South Wales.

What I did was call together the users of graduates and postgraduates, such as people from the banks, financial advisers and people from the service industries, whether they be fertiliser companies or spray companies, agronomists or departments. I called this group together and put to them the proposition that we ought to be doing better in higher education. At this point, I want to relate my marks loosely to the bill and indicate that, in tertiary education, the rationalisation of these most significant disciplines should be meeting needs and should be more market driven than they currently are.

Mr Latham —Full fees?

Mr CADMAN —I have no problem with full fees because, if we were really to meet market needs instead of just continuing past practices based on a tenure system, I believe that we would really start to provide the quality of graduates that industries and users need. One of the remarks I struck in this process was that many of the users of graduates found that the quality of people coming to serve them, even of those with higher degrees, was not of the substance they really needed. They were not practical enough, they did not have the scope of world view that was sufficient and they were not of a quality to be completely employable. In part, what we are doing in agriculture education is wasted. As a solution, people like newspaper proprietors, the users of graduates and postgraduates with doctoral degrees and the users in the education system, all said, `Let's improve the quality of what we're doing. Let's look at a comprehensive approach to agricultural education from paddock to plate so that all the related disciplines are melded into a comprehensive approach. Let's endeavour to provide a high quality, world-class, excellent focus on what we do in this field and, in doing so, we can consolidate some of the activities'— [start page 3915]

Dr Nelson —A very important speech is being made here.

Mr CADMAN —Thank you.

Dr Nelson —A Cadman oration.

Mr CADMAN —Yes, it is. I do not mind if members do not listen, but do not interrupt me.

The SPEAKER —The member for Mitchell has the call and will address his remarks through the chair.

Mr CADMAN —If they can consolidate the process so that the focus is on excellence and on a properly funded process so that we build the links, as I have said, from the University of Sydney in Broadway to Hawkesbury, then we will have an excellent service.

The SPEAKER —Has the member for Mitchell concluded his remarks?

Mr CADMAN —Yes, I have. I wonder where the Labor speaker is. (Quorum formed)

Author: Alan Cadman MP
Source: House Hansard - 27th June 2002
Release Date: 2 Jul 2002

 
 




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